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The Quantum Potential As A Direct Energy Amplifier

The Patterson device and the Lawandy device also can partially utilize a quantum potential, which power engineers presently know zilch about, and which most physicists know very little about.1  The degree of susceptibility to initiating a quantum potential (QP) is a function of the phase conjugate reflection activity produced by each collector (particle or bead). Formation of a quantum potential adds a totally new dimension to the energy collection: Once the QP forms, each collector (bead or particle) has some fraction of participation in the overall quantum potential. This means that the energy appearing at one station has a fraction of its energy simultaneously and instantly appear at every other participating station, and vice versa. The primary station does not "lose" any energy in this transaction, because now the local space is partially multiply-connected. In a multiply connected space, an object, field, or amount of energy can exist simultaneously in two different, widely separated, spatial locations (as seen by an external observer outside the system.) In this case, to the external observer direct energy multiplication occurs, which violates any "energy propagation" model of energy transfer in a singly-connected space.

Nonetheless, overall conservation of energy is not violated when the vacuum interaction is included. One is simply replicating the same ordering (template) of the local vacuum, at multiple locations simultaneously. So the excess energy arises from the local vacuum at each station (as seen by the external observer). In the particular case, imperfections in the quantum potential process limit the amount of direct energy amplification, by limiting the degree to which a multiply connected space is achieved. Also, as the multiple connections in space improve and energy amplification rises, the distortion and instability of the multiple space connections i.e., the degradation of what Wheeler called wormholes) increase exponentially.

This provides a maximum, finite stability level so that the QP stabilizes at a finite value, as does the energy amplification factor. Otherwise, there would be no limit whatsoever to the amount of energy that a quantum potential -- e.g., as in Lawandy's new form of lasing -- would rapidly produce. In fact, if perfectly formed in a perfect, multiply connected space, a QP would immediately produce a self-inflated "false vacuum," and a great new "Big Bang", resulting in the creation of an entirely new universe, separate from this one. Whether or not it would utterly destroy this particular universe is a matter of conjecture. Fortunately, we need not worry about creating a new "Big Bang"; the normal processes allow the formation of only a fractional QP, with rapid degradation and total clamping of the maximum energy level, for a particular QP-generating process.

We published the mechanism for making a quantum potential some time ago, obscurely in 1989 and later in a book, Gravitobiology, in 1991. At any rate, the exposŤ of the use of multipass collection, negative absorption by the medium, iterative retroreflection of scattered energy, and the quantum potential as a method of enhancing energy collection in overunity devices is planned for future articles.


  1. See David J. Bohm, "A Suggested Interpretation of the Quantum Theory in Terms of 'Hidden' Variables, I and II," Physical Review, 85(2), Jan. 15, 1952, p. 166-179 (Part I); 189-193 (Part II); ___ "Hidden Variables and the Implicate Order," Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm, Eds. B.J. Hiley and F. David Peat, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, p. 33. See also D.J. Bohm and B.J. Hiley, "On the Intuitive Understanding of Nonlocality as Implied by Quantum Theory," Foundations of Physics, 5(1), March 1975, p. 93-109; ____ "The de Broglie Pilot Wave Theory and the Further Development of New Insights Arising Out of It," Foundations of Physics, 12(10), 1982, p. 1001-1016; ___ "Unbroken Quantum Realism, from Microscopic to Macroscopic Levels," Physical Review Letters, Vol. 55, 1985, p. 2511-2514. See particularly B.J. Hiley and F. David Peat, Eds., Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1987, reprinted in 1988.